A more helpful git log

The git log command is useful in viewing history of changed repository content, but the default output leaves a lot to be desired:

gitlog1

An easy enhancement to the default is to add the “–oneline” parameter which makes it easier to see commit history in a linear fashion:

gitlog2

The colors here are part of my .gitconfig settings and are helpful for parsing commit SHA’s from commit log messages. But, we can do better than this…

Try adding this git “hist” alias to your own .gitconfig file to produce an even more helpful git log output:

[alias]
 fa = fetch --all
 far = fetch --all --recurse-submodules 
 hist = log --pretty=format:'%Cred%h%Creset - %s %Cgreen(%cr) %C(bold blue)<%an>%Creset %C(yellow)%d%Creset' --abbrev-commit

Now, running “git hist” will produce this more easily parseable version of git log output, one that can be quite useful in finding exact commits by relative date:

gitlog3

Much better, don’t you think?

 

Gitlab Repo Best Practices

I recently had to come up with some guidelines for others to use when it comes to using shared Gitlab repositories in a CI/CD configuration. Here is my take based on my experiences so far, if you have any more to share please drop me a line/comment here.

Note: Gitlab uses the term Merge Request for what is commonly referred to in other CI frameworks as Pull Requests… just a little FYI 🙂

Gitlab Repo Usage – Best Practices and Tips

  • Create MR’s when you are at a point where you want/need to see your changes in action (i.e., merged into master, tested, and deployed).
  • If you will be making more related changes later in the branch, do not opt to have the source branch removed from the repository when submitting your MR.
  • At a minimum, you should merge at least once per day, especially if others are working on the same codebase at the same time. This makes it easier to resolve merge conflicts, which occur when two developers change the same repository content/object in their own respective branches and one merges ahead of the other.
  • Merge conflicts happen. Don’t worry if you experience one. Try to troubleshoot on your own, but if you cannot resolve it by yourself, pull in the other developer(s) whose changes are affecting your merge attempt and work together to resolve them.
  • When creating a MR, indicate in the Title whether or not it is time-sensitive by adding ” – ASAP” to the end of the Title text. This helps reviewers prioritize their review requests with minimal disruption.
  • Do NOT approve your own MR if it involves a code change. The peer-review component of Merge Requests is an opportunity to communicate and share awareness of changes on the team. That said, here are some scenarios where it is ok to approve your own MR’s:
    • you are pushing non-operational changes (e.g., comments, documentation)
    • you are the only developer available and it’s an important change or if waiting for MR review blocks progress signficantly (use good judgment)
  • When adding to a branch, keep your commits as specific as possible when modifying code. Each commit should be understandable on its own, even if there are other commits in the branch
  • Not all MR’s need to hit a pipeline. Depending on the repo pipeline configuration, some branch name filters may exist to insure a certain type of branch gets tested while other types do not. This is especially true of non-code changes (e.g., updating a README)
  • When starting new development as opposed to modifying existing code, it may make sense to create a personal repo or to use a fork of a shared repo to do a lot of iteration quickly without having to do a formal MR process in a shared repo. Once you’ve got some code ready for sharing, you can migrate it manually (copy) into the shared repo and work off MR’s going forward. Not required at all, but it can allow for more rapid iteration especially on small teams.